Charlotte Hodgman

 

Charlotte Hodgman is Deputy Editor for BBC History Magazine 

© Illustration by Glen McBeth
17/10/2016

Gaol fever is epidemic typhus (not typhoid), and can be prevented by vaccination...

This Q&A was first published in the March 2013 issue of BBC History Magazine

12/10/2016

Eadnoth the Staller was one of England’s most significant quislings: an Anglo-Saxon official and landowner who nonetheless took up service with the new Norman regime, after 1066.

This article was first published in 2011

The 380-metre long Royal Galleries at Ostend (Getty)
10/10/2016

In the November 2016 issue of BBC History Magazine, Dr Kathryn Ferry selects the Belgian coast as her favourite place. History Extra caught up with her to find out more...

21/09/2016

Were there any movements similar to the suffragettes throughout Europe at the same time?

This article was first published in 2010

Hitler meets members of the Reich Labour Service. (AKG)
15/09/2016

Are any laws created by the Nazi regime from 1933–45 still in use in Germany, or did the whole legal system start from scratch after 1945?

This Q&A was first published in the March 2013 issue of BBC History Magazine

Illustration by Femke de Jong
13/09/2016

Chris Bowlby takes a look at the history of money and the institutions that back it.

This article was first published in 2011

Katherine Parr, c1545. (Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
12/09/2016

Following Katherine’s death a matter of days after Mary’s birth, the newborn’s father, Thomas Seymour, placed Mary in the household of his brother, the Duke of Somerset...

This article was first published in 2010

Knights of the round tree trunk. © Glen McBeth
09/09/2016

Where does the game come from and is it archery related?

This article was first published in 2010

A flyleaf of an original edition of 'Mein Kampf' by Adolf Hitler.
18/07/2016

It is said that Adolf Hitler became very wealthy through sales of his Mein Kampf book. What happened to his money after his death?

Monument to Spanish Civil War © Dreamstime
15/07/2016

Spain’s army rose up against its left-wing Republican government in July 1936. The civil war that ensued is often viewed as a precursor to the Second World War for the way it sucked in the wider international community. Best-selling military historian Antony Beevor talked to David Musgrove about the conflict and its wide-reaching consequences...

This article was first published in the July 2006 issue of BBC History Magazine

 

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