TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (25-30 October)

Can't decide what programmes to watch or listen to? Here we round up the history TV and radio shows you won't want to miss

Channel 4

Walking Through History
Channel 4
Saturday 25 October, 8.00pm

Returning with another series of hikes, Tony Robinson heads for Brontë country. As well as visiting the places that helped inspire Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, he learns more about the lives of the literary sisters Charlotte, Emily and Anne. (Pictured above)

Find out more here.

 

Archive On 4: Cerys Goes Under Milk Wood
Radio 4
Saturday 25th October, 8.00pm

Cerys Matthews revisits 1960s recordings made by her uncle, Colin Edwards, that capture friends and relatives of Dylan Thomas remembering the poet. Also this week, which sees the centenary of Thomas’s death, look out for a contemporary performance of Under Milk Wood (BBC Four, Sunday 26 October, 7.00pm) starring, among others, Michael Sheen (first shown on BBC Wales).

Find out more here.

 

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
PBS America
Sunday 26 October, 8.00pm

The second part of Ken Burns’ superb series covers 1901–10. These were years when Theodore Roosevelt ascended to the presidency. Meanwhile, Franklin, who would take some years to escape his cousin’s shadow, attended Harvard and fell for the daughter of Teddy’s brother, Eleanor.

Find out more here.

 

Tutankhamun: The Truth Uncovered
BBC One
Sunday 26 October, 9.00pm

How did Tutankhamun meet his end? Dallas Campbell looks on as scientists conduct a virtual autopsy on the boy king’s mummified remains. Through techniques such as a CT scan and DNA analysis, we’re offered a new theory as to what caused Tutankhamun’s death. (Pictured below)

Find out more here.

BBC

 

Afghanistan: The Lion’s Last Roar?
BBC Two
Sunday 26 October, 9.00pm

In one of those early takes on history the BBC does so well, experts and those who were there look back at events eight years ago, when the British Army deployed in Helmand. As the title suggests, the two-part documentary raises the idea that Afghanistan marks the end of the UK as a global military power.

Find out more here.

 

Pick of the week...

Voices Of The First World War
Radio 4
Monday 27 October, 1.45pm

A major new series brings together the archives of the BBC and the Imperial War Museum to tell the story of 1914–18 through first-hand accounts. The series will run until 1918, and the first tranche of 10 weekday episodes covers such subjects as the Battle of Mons and the Great Retreat. Dan Snow narrates.

Find our more here.

 

The Art Of Gothic: Britain’s Midnight Hour
BBC Four
Monday 27 October, 9.00pm

For the second part of his excellent series, Andrew Graham-Dixon looks at the evolution of Gothic in the 19th century. This was the century of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, John Martin’s extraordinary and apocalyptic paintings, and the construction of the Palace of Westminster.

Find out more here.

 

Architects Of The Divine: The First Gothic Age
BBC Four
Tuesday 28 October, 9.00pm

Janina Ramirez charts the history of medieval Gothic architecture in England. While it was a style initially imported from France, the altogether less fussy Perpendicular Gothic variation was indisputably English and its adoption, suggests Ramirez, marks the birth of a nation. Expect awe-inspiring cathedrals.

Find out more here.

 

Imagine…
BBC One
Tuesday 28 October, 10.35pm

In 1936, Adolf Hitler decreed that artworks created by Jewish painters or owned by Jewish collectors should be viewed as “degenerate”. Many precious works were simply destroyed, but others disappeared into private hands. In a two-part documentary, Alan Yentob focuses on the horde accumulated by Nazi art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt, which only recently came to light.

Find out more here.

 

In A Nutshell
Radio 4
Thursday 30 October, 11.30am

New England heiress and amateur criminologist Frances Glessner Lee was a key figure in the early history of forensic science. In the 1940s, working with a carpenter, she created a series of dolls’ houses, the Nutshell Studies, each showing crime scenes, a means to help train detectives. Poet Simon Armitage travels to Baltimore to learn more.

Find out more here.

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