Discovering Tutankhamun

Eminent Eyptologist Zahi Hawass has authored a new book reviewing what we know about the life and death of Tutankhamun in light of the latest investigations and newest technology.

The 11kg mask depicts an idealised portrait of the young king. The Egyptians thought that the flesh of gods was made of gold, and so fittingly used this metal to create the mask. The eyes were made of quartz.

About the images

Eminent Eyptologist Zahi Hawass has authored a new book reviewing what we know about the life and death of Tutankhamun in light of the latest investigations and newest technology.

Advertisement

A fully illustrated new study boasting a wealth of images, Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA places the king in the broader context of Egyptian history.

The book unravels the much-debated relationship between various members of the royal family, and the circumstances surrounding the turbulent Amarna period. It also explains the religious background and complex beliefs about the afterlife that defined many features of Tutankhamun’s tomb.

Hawass also details the modern X-raying and CT-scanning of the king’s mummy, in addition to the latest DNA examination.

Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA is published by the American University in Cairo Press. To find out more about the book, click here.

Advertisement

All images © Semmel Concerts/Sandro Vannini

Featured on the tomb of Ay, from the 18th Dynasty.
Featured on the tomb of Ay, from the 18th Dynasty.
Hatshepsut, Egypt's first female pharaoh, spent 22 years on the throne. In 2007 the Egyptian Mummy Project identified an unknown mummy as that of Hatshepsut. Examination suggests she died of cancer.
Hatshepsut, Egypt’s first female pharaoh, spent 22 years on the throne. In 2007 the Egyptian Mummy Project identified an unknown mummy as that of Hatshepsut. Examination suggests she died of cancer.
The 11kg mask depicts an idealised portrait of the young king. The Egyptians thought that the flesh of gods was made of gold, and so fittingly used this metal to create the mask. The eyes were made of quartz.
The 11kg mask depicts an idealised portrait of the young king. The Egyptians thought that the flesh of gods was made of gold, and so fittingly used this metal to create the mask. The eyes were made of quartz.
Made of wood and gilded or sheathed in sheets of gold, the chair is covered in intricate decoration - coloured glass and semiprecious stones.
Made of wood and gilded or sheathed in sheets of gold, the chair is covered in intricate decoration – coloured glass and semiprecious stones.
The king is seen sitting casually on an armless chair, while the queen anoints him with perfumed oil. On her head is a 'Nubian' wig, a short hairstyle that became popular with women during the Amarna Period.
The king is seen sitting casually on an armless chair, while the queen anoints him with perfumed oil. On her head is a ‘Nubian’ wig, a short hairstyle that became popular with women during the Amarna Period.
The wood was covered with gold foil inlaid with coloured glass and faience. The king's eyes and eyebrows are inlaid stone and glass.
The wood was covered with gold foil inlaid with coloured glass and faience. The king’s eyes and eyebrows are inlaid stone and glass.