Amesbury in Wiltshire confirmed as oldest UK settlement

A Wiltshire town has been confirmed as the longest continuous settlement in the United Kingdom. Amesbury, including Stonehenge, has been continually occupied since BC8820, experts have found.

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A Wiltshire town has been confirmed as the longest continuous settlement in the United Kingdom. Amesbury, including Stonehenge, has been continually occupied since BC8820, experts have found. The news was confirmed following an archaeological dig which also unearthed evidence of frogs’ legs being eaten in Britain 8,000 years before France, BBC News reports. Previously, Thatcham in Berkshire, 40 miles from Amesbury, held the record for the longest continuous settlement in the country.

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Five places Richard III may have wanted to be buried (and none of them are Leicester)

There are at least five places Richard III would have wanted to be buried, and none are Leicester, eminent historian Professor Michael Hicks has told History Extra. Hicks, who is head of history at the University of Winchester, said the last Plantagenet king may have wanted to be laid to rest at Middleham, Northamptonshire, London, York or County Durham.

 

History-mad schoolboy turns bedroom into Admiral Nelson museum

A nine-year-old boy is charging friends and family to visit a Nelson museum that he has set up in his bedroom. Shae Williams from Norwich became obsessed with Nelson last summer after learning about him in a history book. He has since crammed his room with hundreds of items of Nelson memorabilia, including a piece of metal from his flagship HMS Victory, the Metro reports. He is charging £2 for adults, 50p per child and £4 for a family ticket to visit his bedroom and see his collection.

To read the Metro article in full, click here.

Van Dyck appeal keeps self-portrait in UK

The National Portrait Gallery has successfully raised the £10m required to keep Sir Anthony Van Dyck’s final self-portrait in the country. A public appeal saw 10,000 individuals donate more than £1.4m. The portrait, painted shortly before the Flemish artist died in 1641, had been sold abroad in 2013 before a temporary export ban was imposed. It will remain on display at the gallery until 31 August, before research and conservation work are undertaken.

To read the BBC News article in full, click here.

 

Kim Philby had no regrets about betraying Britain to the Soviet Union, recordings reveal

Kim Philby, one of the most successful spies to work as a mole at the heart of the British establishment for the Soviet Union, had “no regrets”, a previously unheard recording has revealed. The Telegraph reports that a voice recording made during a talk Philby gave for KGB officers in 1977, 14 years after defecting to the Soviet Union, captures him saying: “There is an awful lot of work for us to do it seems. I have no regrets whatsoever about the past, just the mistakes I made doing it.” Philby passed information back to his Soviet handlers from his position as a long-term mole at the heart of the British Secret Intelligence Service, MI6.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

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