TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (9–15 October)

Can't decide what programmes to watch or listen to? Here are 10 you won't want to miss...

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Music for Misfits: The Story of Indie
BBC Four
Friday 9 October, 10.00pm

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The story of Britain’s indie scene reaches the 1980s. This was a decade when cottage-industry labels became increasingly professional, enabling bands such as The Smiths and New Order to enjoy major success without signing for major labels. Interviewees include Shaun Ryder of Happy Mondays, Suede’s Bernard Butler and the KLF art prankster Bill Drummond. Mark Radcliffe presents.

Find out more here.

In Search of Great Uncle Frank
Radio 4
Monday 12 October, 11.00am

In 1915, teenage soldier Frank Hinnels was among those who landed at Gallipoli. He never made it home, and died in what’s now Turkey. A century later, his great-nephew, Hugh Dennis, follows in his uncle’s footsteps and sees the very spot where his relative fell.

Find out more here.

Peter Snow Returns to the Future
Radio 4
Monday 12 October, 1.45pm

Inspired by the 1985 movie Back To The Future, Peter Snow invites guests to travel in time with him. In the first of 10 weekday episodes, Labour MP Alan Johnson heads back to the darkest days of the Victorian mill system – and then forward to the end of work as we know it.

Find out more here.

The Celts: Blood, Iron and Sacrifice with Alice Roberts and Neil Oliver
BBC Two
Monday 12 October, 9.00pm

Roberts and Oliver look back to an era when the La Tène warrior culture was in the ascendency and the Celtic world extended as far as central Turkey. We also hear about the conflict between the Gauls, led by Vercingetorixm, and the Roman Empire under Julius Caesar.

Find out more here.

Pick of the Week…

The Secret Life of Books: The Faerie Queene
BBC Four
Tuesday 13 October, 8.30pm

The series exploring classic works of fiction returns. First up, Janina Ramirez focuses on Edmund Spenser’s Elizabethan-era poem. While it’s a text primarily associated with its fantasy elements, should we also see the book as a commentary on the brutality associated with the Tudor occupation of Ireland?

Find out more here.

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Dr Janina Ramirez at Kilcolman Castle – Edmund Spenser’s colonial home and the place where he wrote The Faerie Queene. (Credit: BBC)

Restoring Britain’s Landmarks
Channel 4
Wednesday 14 October, 8.00pm

The Landmark Trust restores dilapidated historical buildings and makes them available for holiday rental, which is a way to preserve the structures for the future. This new documentary series follows the charity’s work, including bringing Belmont House in Lyme Regis, a Georgian villa that was once home to novelist John Fowles of French Lieutenant’s Woman fame, back to life.

Find out more here.

Face of Britain by Simon Schama
BBC Two
Wednesday 14 October, 9.00pm

Episode three of his series on portraiture, and Simon Schama discusses fame and celebrity. He begins with Princess Diana before looping back to consider such figures as Francis Drake, Nelson’s squeeze Emma Hart, and Cecil Beaton’s photographs of bohemian aristocrats, the ‘Bright Young Things’ who dazzled the 1920s.

Find out more here.

Planet Oil: The Treasure That Conquered the World
BBC Four
Wednesday 14 October, 9.00pm

In the second instalment of his series on how oil has shaped our world, Iain Stewart looks back to the 1970s, when the OPEC countries hiked prices. He also looks at the technological developments needed to make the offshore fields of the North Sea financially viable.

Find out more here.

In Our Time
Radio 4
Thursday 15 October, 9.00am

In 1526, Bavarian artist Hans Holbein the Younger travelled to England in search of work. He would go on to paint, among others, Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII and the young Edward VI. Melvyn Bragg and learned guests discuss Holbein’s time in Henry’s court.

Find out more here.

A Very British Romance with Lucy Worsley
BBC Four
Thursday 15 October, 9.00pm

Lucy Worsley looks at love, courtship and romantic fiction in the Victorian era. Medieval ideas around chivalry, it turns out, were important in the 19th century. Worsley also considers how writers such as Charlotte Bronte, Mrs Henry Wood and HG Wells shaped our forebears’ emotional lives.

Find out more here.

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Lucy Worsley dressed as Jane Eyre with Mr Rochester. (Credit: BBC)