TV & Radio

TV and radio listings will be updated every Friday

The Impressionists: Painting And Revolution
The Impressionists: Painting And Revolution
BBC Two
Saturday 23rd July, 8.00pm

Waldemar Januszczak continues his series arguing we should see the Impressionists as revolutionaries. His focus this week is in large part on how new developments aided the artists – once there were trains to take you to the countryside, for example, it was a lot easier to find pastoral scenes to paint.

Tony Robinson Down Under
Tony Robinson Down Under
History
Saturday 23rd July, 10.00pm

The final episode in the Time Team presenter’s excellent series charts the history of Australia in the modern era, taking in attitudes to the UK and to the country-continent’s Aboriginal peoples. Also this week on History, Who Really Discovered America? (Tuesday 26th July, 8.00 pm) considers who may have reached the New World pre-Columbus.

Russia: The Wild East
Russia: The Wild East
Radio 4
Monday 25th July, 3.45pm

Martin Sixsmith’s history of Russia continues with the nation’s epic struggle against the Nazis in the Second World War. Expect weekday programmes devoted to the battles at Leningrad and Stalingrad, plus the immediate post-conflict era when the chill of the Cold War first descended. There’s an omnibus show on Friday (9.00pm).

The Life Of Muhammad
The Life of Muhammad
BBC Two
Monday 25th July, 9.00pm

Rageh Omaar’s biography of the founder of Islam concludes with the prophet’s later life. Subjects under consideration include the establishment of Islamic law, Sharia, the roots of the concept of Jihad and Muhammad’s use of marriage to help him build alliances.

British Masters
British Masters
BBC Four
Monday 25th July, 9.00pm

James Fox looks at Brit-artists who made their reputations in the years after the Second World War. As well as names you might expect – notably Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon and David Hockney – Fox also highlights the work of lesser-known Keith Vaughan.

The Long View
The Long View
Radio 4
Tuesday 26th July, 9.00am

In the 1950s, the Manchester Guardian became The Guardian. In 1964, the paper, which wanted to establish itself as a national player, moved its editorial operations south to London. Jonathan Freedland considers what this earlier relocation might tell us about the north-side divide in media and the BBC’s decision to move some of its national programme-making operations to Salford.

Restoration Home
Restoration Home
BBC Two
Tuesday 26th July, 8.00pm

Caroline Quentin looks on as the owners of damp and squalid Stanwick Hall in Northamptonshire try to bring the building back to life. Along the way, research reveals the house’s links to a financial scandal in the early 18th century.

Voices From The Old Bailey
Voices From The Old Bailey
Radio 4
Wednesday 27th July, 9.00am

Amanda Vickery delves through the archives of the Old Bailey to discover what they tell us about 18th-century life. The theme of the first documentary in a four-part series is riots. The disturbances she highlights range from sailors smashing up a brothel to the infinitely more serious, anti-Catholic Gordon riots.

Harold Baim’s Britain On Film
Harold Baim’s Britain On Film
BBC Four
Wednesday 27th July, 8.30pm

The Britain Through A Lens strand continues with the work of Harold Baim, who made travelogues devoted to different parts of the nation from the 1940s to the 1980s. Rather improbably, the narrator of some of these films was none other than Telly Savalas, aka Kojak.

Towns With Nicholas Crane
Town With Nicholas Crane
BBC Two
Thursday 28th July, 9.00pm

The geographer and adventurer kicks off a new series on Britain’s towns by visiting Ludlow on the English side of the border with Wales. For all that it’s small and landlocked, Crane learns, it’s also home to an enviable selection of listed buildings and, should you be peckish and feeling flush, a couple of Michelin-starred restaurants too.