TV & Radio

TV and radio listings will be updated every Friday

Servants: The True Story of Life Below Stairs
Servants: The True Story of Life Below Stairs
BBC Two
Friday 5th October, 9.00pm

Social historian Dr Pamela Cox looks back at the lives of servants during the Edwardian era. This was a time when those who worked in service began to question Victorian ideas around knowing your place, and when new opportunities in factories and shops opened up.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

© Dreamstime
Pick of the Week
Arena: The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour Revisited
BBC Two
Saturday 6th October, 9.45pm

In 1967, The Beatles recorded a TV special. As this documentary recalls, the surreal Magical Mystery Tour (showing at 10.45pm) simply confused many viewers. Plus it’s 50 years this month since the release of the Fab Four’s debut single, as explored by Stuart Maconie in Love Me Do: The Beatles ’62 (BBC Four, Sunday 7th October, 10.00pm).

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Andrew Marr’s History of the World
Andrew Marr’s History of the World
BBC One
Sunday 7th October, 9.00pm

Another week, another adventure in world history as Andrew Marr focuses on the spiritual revolutions that shaped the world between 300BC and 700AD. Over at Downton Abbey (ITV1, 9.00pm), Branson’s political views land him in hot water and the recruitment process for a new footman commences.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Cheaper Than Walking
Cheaper Than Walking
Radio 4
Monday 8th October, 11.00am

From where did the Mini spring? As Andy Kershaw here relates, for a brief time in the wake of the Second World War, family-run British motor manufacturers specialised in making austerity-appropriate micro-cars. Over on BBC Four, Time Shift: Magnificent Machines – The Golden Age of the British Sports Car (9.00pm) considers rather higher-powered motors, such as the Jaguar E-Type.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Book of the Week: On the Map
Book of the Week: On the Map
Radio 4
Monday 8th October, 9.45pm

Beginning with Ptolemy’s atlas, Simon Garfield explores how cartographers have mapped the development of civilisations. In another weekday series, China: As History is my Witness (Radio 4, 1.45pm) finds Carrie Gracie looking at how stories of China’s past help explain the country today.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

The Great Train Robbery
The Great Train Robbery
ITV1
Monday 8th October, 10.35pm

The south London criminals who took down the Glasgow-London mail train on 8 August 1963 have gone down as folk heroes. Is that really how we should see them? Dominic Sandbrook is among those looking back at a violent crime that yielded Ronnie Biggs and co £2.6 million.

Find out more at the Radio Times website

 

The Story of Wales
The Story of Wales
BBC Two
Tuesday 9th October, 7.00pm

Shown over three successive evenings, Huw Edwards continues and concludes his history of Wales. He begins with the industrial revolution, in great part powered by coal mined in the Valleys. Also this week, the great depression and the founding of devolved government.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Ian Hislop’s Stiff Upper Lip
Ian Hislop’s Stiff Upper Lip
BBC Two
Tuesday 9th October, 9.00pm

The Private Eye editor’s series on the British and their emotions considers the 19th century, when repressing the emotions was at its zenith. The characters we meet include Captain Matthew Webb, the first person to swim the Channel. But the imperial swagger underpinning British stoicism wouldn’t survive the first world war.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Wartime Farm
Wartime Farm
BBC Two
Thursday 11th October, 8.00pm

Peter Ginn, Ruth Goodman and Alex Langlands revisit 1943, when Britain’s farmers came under huge pressure to increase production still further. Over on Channel 5, Heroes Of The Skies (8.00pm) tells the story of the Tuskegee Airmen, African-American pilots who fought in the Second World War.

Find out more at the BBC TV and Radio programming website

 

Battle Castle with Dan Snow
Battle Castle with Dan Snow
Discovery
Thursday 11th October, 9.00pm

In a new series, Dan Snow charts the history of siege warfare. He begins in (pre-recent conflict) Syria with the imposing Crac des Chevaliers, which was built by crusaders. In 1271, it was attacked by Sultan Baybars and his Mamluk army and captured after a campaign that lasted 36 days.

Find out more at the Discovery website

 

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