TV & Radio

TV and radio listings will be updated every Friday

The Art Of Monarchy
The Art Of Monarchy
Radio 4
Saturday 17th March, 10.30am

Will Gompertz turns his attention to objects from the Royal Collection that illustrate the relationship between the monarchy and change. Also today, listen out for Archive On Four: The Licence To Kill (Radio 4, 8.00pm), in which BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera looks at the history of state-sponsored assassination.

Go to the BBC iPlayer website

How God Made The English
Pick of the Week
How God Made The English
BBC Two
Saturday 17th March, 8.00pm

What does it mean to be English? For Diarmaid MacCulloch, it’s an identity bound up with an idea pinched from scripture by the Venerable Bede, that of being a chosen people. In the first episode of an excellent new series, MacCulloch shows how adopting this notion has led to the English thinking of themselves as better than others.

Go to the BBC iPlayer website

The Falklands’ Most Daring Raid
The Falklands’ Most Daring Raid
Channel 4
Sunday 18th March, 8.00pm

Here’s a documentary that tells the unlikely story of how in 1982 an aged Vulcan flew 8,000 miles on a raid against Port Stanley’s runway in a bid to stop the airfield being used by Argentine fighters. Also marking the 30th anniversary of the South Atlantic conflict, look out for Return To The Falklands (ITV1, Tuesday 20 March, 9.00pm).

Go to the Channel 4 website

Britain’s First Photo Album
Britain’s First Photo Album
BBC Two
Monday 19th March, 6.30pm

John Sergeant continues his weekday series following in the footsteps of pioneering Victorian photographer Francis Frith. Among other highlights along the way, he learns about the restoration of Monmouthshire canals, tries his hand at traditional Scottish baking and meets a family whose forebears were captured on camera more than 120 years ago.

Go to the BBC iPlayer website

China: Triumph And Turmoil
China: Triumph And Turmoil
Channel 4
Monday 19th March, 8.00pm

Niall Ferguson explores the life of Mao-Tse Tung. China’s former leader was responsible for the death of more of his own people than Hitler and Stalin combined, yet today he’s still hugely revered. How should we explain this apparent paradox?

Go to Channel 4 website

Document
Document
Radio 4
Monday 19th March, 8.00pm

The latest series of the historical investigation series concludes with Mike Thomson looking back at 1942. It was a year when British troops were fighting the Vichy French, so why did the chiefs of staff go behind Winston Churchill’s back to make contact with the regime?

Go to the BBC iPlayer website

Empire
Empire
BBC Two
Monday 19th March, 9.00pm

Jeremy Paxman turns his attention to trade as he continues his series on the British Empire. The imperial era, he argues, began in some respects as a “pirates’ treasure hunt”. From this apparently unpromising start, a global financial network gradually developed.

Go the BBC iPlayer website

Cilla’s Unswung Sixties
Cilla’s Unswung Sixties
Yesterday
Monday 19th March, 9.00pm

Not everyone in the 1960s was hip. In truth, as Cilla Black explores in this documentary, a lorra, lorra people didn’t turn on, tune in or drop out. Also in Yesterday’s Spirit Of The Sixties season, look out for I Was A Jet Set Stewardess (Wednesday 21 March, 10.00pm) and From Blackpool To Benidorm (Thursday 22 March, 9.00pm).

She Wolves: England’s Early Queens
She Wolves: England’s Early Queens
BBC Four
Wednesday 21st March, 9.00pm

Helen Castor concludes her series on royal women with the Tudor era, when both Mary and Elizabeth ascended to the throne. She also considers the tragic figure of Lady Jane Grey, the Nine Days’ Queen and great-granddaughter of Henry VII, who was executed in 1554.

Go to the BBC iPlayer website

Sex And Sensibility: The Allure Of Art Nouveau
Sex And Sensibility: The Allure Of Art Nouveau
BBC Four
Thursday 22nd March, 9.00pm

Ever ready with a quip and a pun, Stephen Smith presents a three-part series about the early 20th-century art and design movement. In the first episode, Smith explores Paris, where he views jewellery created by René Lalique, glassware made by Émile Gallé and the city’s marvellous Métro stations.

Go to the BBC iPlayer page

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