History TV and radio: what’s on next week (21-26 April 2018)

Can't decide which shows to watch or listen to next week? Here are 10 programmes you won't want to miss...

The Woman In White. (BBC/Origin Pictures)

Britain’s Most Historic Towns

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Channel 4

Saturday 21 April, 8.00pm

Professor Alice Roberts heads for Winchester to explore the Norman history of the city that William the Conqueror made the heart of his kingdom. This involves storming a castle while dressed in chain mail, learning about the history of surgery and tucking in to eel pie.

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Archive On 4: The Long Shadow Of Canary Wharf

BBC Radio 4

Saturday 21 April, 8.00pm

It’s three decades since work began on One Canada Square, the skyscraper colloquially known as Canary Wharf. Journalist Jane Martinson, who grew up in east London herself, looks back at its construction, and considers how the development of the Isle of Dogs has impacted on the area and its residents.

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Imagine… Habaneros: You Say You Want A Revolution?

BBC Two

Saturday 21 April, 9.00pm

Julien Temple’s portrait of Cuba mixes archive material with footage shot over the past three years to explore the island’s history, and to gauge the mood of the people of Havana as Raúl Castro steps down as president. Concludes on Sunday on BBC Four (9.00pm).

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(BBC Studios/Essential Arts)
Imagine… Habaneros: You Say You Want A Revolution? (BBC Studios/Essential Arts)

The Reunion

BBC Radio 4

Sunday 22 April, 11.15am

In the 1970s, the Baader-Meinhof gang terrorised West Germany with a series of bombings, assassinations and hijackings. Those joining Sue MacGregor to look back at the gang’s story are ex-member Peter Jurgen Boock, former counter-terrorism chief Rainer Hofmeyer, radical lawyer Kurt Groenewold and journalist Stephan Aust.

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Pick of the week

The Woman In White

BBC One

Sunday 22 April, 9.00pm

The BBC’s latest classic serial is an elegant five-part adaptation of Wilkie Collins’ mystery, a tale of duplicity, madness, the pursuit of money and the unfair treatment of women within Victorian society. As proto-feminist Marian Halcombe, Jessie Buckley gets most of the best lines.

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Imperial Echo

BBC Radio 4

Monday 23 April, 8.00pm

In the wake of the London Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting, Jonny Dymond, BBC radio’s royal correspondent, considers the institution’s history. It’s a tale that goes back to the Victorian era of empire, and Dymond also considers current efforts to redefine the role of the Commonwealth.

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Secret Agent Selection: WW2

BBC Two

Monday 23 April, 9.00pm

Things get tougher for the nine remaining students as the living history series about Special Operations Executive training continues. This week they’re dropped in middle of the Highlands, where they’re schooled in techniques employed by the agents who were sent to thwart Nazi nuclear ambitions in Norway.

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An Art Lover’s Guide

BBC Four

Monday 23 April, 9.00pm

Janina Ramirez and Alastair Sooke head for Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan. It’s a trading city where east and west meet – and the ancient and modern too. On the shores of the Caspian Sea, we’re shown architecture that recalls 19th-century Paris, prehistoric rock art and a museum devoted to rugs.

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Programme Name: An Art Lovers' Guide - TX: 23/04/2018 - Episode: Baku (No. 3 - Baku) - Picture Shows: in front of the Flame Towers, Baku. Alastair Sooke, Janina Ramirez - (C) BBC - Photographer: Production
An Art Lover’s Guide. (BBC/Origin Pictures)

Guilty Architecture

BBC Radio 4

Thursday 26 April, 11.30am

What should we do about buildings with controversial histories – repair them or let them deteriorate? It’s a question considered by Jonathan Glancey as he visits the Germany, where he sees the crumbling Nuremburg rally ground, and, closer to home, Clandon Park House in Surrey, built on the proceeds of slavery.

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Civilisations

BBC Two

Thursday 26 April, 9.00pm

The art history series concludes with an episode that finds Simon Schama revisiting his central argument, that “societies become civilised to the extent that they take culture as seriously as the prosecution of power or the accumulation of wealth”. Should art be a place of escape or a way to grapple with a machine-driven and profit-hungry world?

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Programme Name: Civilisations - TX: 26/04/2018 - Episode: The Vital Spark (No. n/a) - Picture Shows: Simon Schama with ‘Law of the Journey’ 2017, by Ai Weiwei, National Gallery in Prague. - (C) Nutopia - Photographer: Nutopia
Civilisations. (BBC/nutopia)