MI5 ‘tackled Communist attempts to infiltrate Boy Scouts after Russian Revolution’

The security service spent years investigating a Communist plot to take over the scouting movement in the years after the Russian Revolution, previously unpublished files from the National Archives reveal.

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The security service spent years investigating a Communist plot to take over the scouting movement in the years after the Russian Revolution, previously unpublished files from the National Archives reveal. According to the Telegraph, the files show that MI5 tried to counter to perceived “red” threat, including planning to send an agent to an international jamboree, monitoring phone calls between leading Communists, and investigating supposed Bolshevik attempts to take over scout troops.

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To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.
 

Post Office launches searchable database of postal workers who fought in WW1

Royal Mail has launched an online, searchable database of its 300 war memorials commemorating workers who lost their lives in conflict. Part of commemorations to mark the centenary of the First World War, the website – www.royalmailmemorials.com – contains details of more than 10,000 names. In total, 75,000 employees fought in the war, including 12,000 workers who served in the dedicated regiment of the General Post Office (as it was known at the time), the Post Office Rifles.
 

Historical sex objects to feature in classrooms

An 18th-century chastity belt and phallic Roman amulets are to be used to enrich sex education for secondary school pupils. In an attempt to help students discuss challenging topics, researchers from the University of Exeter are to launch a new taster course for schools that teaches sex education through the examination and discussion of ancient artefacts. The Sex and History project will see youngsters aged between 14 and 19 discuss illustrations of objects from the collection of Sir Henry Wellcome.
 

Edward Heath’s home reopens to public

The house in which former prime minister Sir Edward Heath lived until his death in 2005 has reopened to the public. The house, in Arundells in Salisbury, is the only residence of a British prime minister that remains as it was when he was alive. Visitors will for the first time be able to see Sir Edward’s study, where he worked at a desk originally owned by David Lloyd George.

To find out more about the house, click here.
 

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Could this be the skeleton of a Bronze Age king?

Scientists may be on the verge of solving the mystery of a 4,000-year-old skeleton discovered on farmland near Westbourne in the 1980s. The skeleton – known as Racton Man because of where he was found – is among only a handful of Bronze Age skeletons to have been found buried with a dagger. This could suggest that the man was a special person such as a king or a priest. The dagger might have been used for a ritual purpose, such as sacrifice.