Norfolk wolf coins unearthed in treasure find

An "unusual" hoard of 44 Norfolk wolf coins produced in the latter stages of the 1st Century and found in south Norfolk have been declared treasure, BBC News reports. The Iron Age coins, about the size of a thick modern penny, were minted by the Iceni tribe whose territories covered much of East Anglia. Museum finds officer Adrian Marsden said the coins probably belonged to "a member of tribal hierarchy".

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An “unusual” hoard of 44 Norfolk wolf coins produced in the latter stages of the 1st Century and found in south Norfolk have been declared treasure, BBC News reports. The Iron Age coins, about the size of a thick modern penny, were minted by the Iceni tribe whose territories covered much of East Anglia. Museum finds officer Adrian Marsden said the coins probably belonged to “a member of tribal hierarchy”.

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To read the BBC News article, click here.
 

Leicester skeleton is Richard III’s, leading archaeologist insists

All evidence points to the Leicester skeleton belonging to Richard III, leading archeologist Mike Pitts has said. In an exclusive interview with History Extra, the editor of British Archaeology insisted that, taken together, the DNA testing, radiocarbon dating and damage to the skeleton prove that the remains belong to the former king. “Cumulatively, the evidence makes a very convincing case,” he said. “For all practical purposes, we can say that the skeleton is Richard III’s”.
 

Secret lives of ancient Egyptians revealed by CT scans of mummies

Dental decay was a serious problem in ancient Egypt, and tattoos were already being inked on skin by the 8th century AD. These are just two of the discoveries uncovered by new techniques used to virtually unwrap eight mummies, revealing unprecedented detail about their age, diet and health. Curators at the British Museum have collaborated with scientists and medical experts to use CT scans and 3D visualisation to better understand how people lived and died in the ancient Nile Valley.

Monument status for wreck of ship found off Bamburgh

The remains of an 18th-century ship exposed off the Northumberland coast last year after a tidal surge, has been designated a Scheduled Ancient Monument by English Heritage, BBC News reports. The wreck, which lays about 650m off Bamburgh Castle, now has added protection, making it an offence to damage it. A study suggests the vessel dates from about 1770 and was probably English.

To read the BBC News article, click here.

250-year-old wallpaper uncovered at Woburn Abbey

Some of the earliest wallpaper used in Britain has been uncovered for the first time in nearly 250 years, the Telegraph reports. The rare 18th century Chinese paper was used to decorate the private bed chamber of the fourth Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey in Bedford, Beds. He imported the luxury wallcovering from China but after his death in 1771 it was papered over and forgotten until the recent discovery of an invoice dated 1751.

To read the Telegraph article, click here.

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