Vibrations rotate Manchester Museum’s ancient statue

Traffic and footsteps caused an ancient Egyptian statue to rotate inside its glass case. Curators at Manchester Museum were spooked when a time-lapse video caught the 10-inch high stone statue, named Neb-Senu, spinning by itself.

headlines_16-6f36b8c

Traffic and footsteps caused an ancient Egyptian statue to rotate inside its glass case. Curators at Manchester Museum were spooked when a time-lapse video caught the 10-inch high stone statue, named Neb-Senu, spinning by itself. Vibrations expert Steve Gosling placed a three-axis sensor under Neb-Senu’s glass cabinet to record its movement over 24 hours, which revealed traffic and footfall vibrations at busy times of the day caused the statue to rotate.

Advertisement

Real Second World War tank to be used in Brad Pitt film

A Second World War Tiger 131 tank, believed to be the last of its type in working order, is to feature in a new Hollywood movie. Restored by experts at the Tank Museum, the Tiger has been loaned to the producers of upcoming war film Fury.

‘Transformed’ Tate Britain unveiled

The results of a £45 million renovation of the oldest parts of the Grade II Tate gallery are to be revealed. Included in the makeover is the restoration of The Expedition in Pursuit of Rare Meats 1926-7, a famous mural by Rex Whistler in the restaurant that bears his name, and the installation of a new archive gallery for the presentation of temporary displays.

Richard III battle of Bosworth painting brought out of hiding

An oil painting depicting Richard III’s last stand at the battle of Bosworth has gone on display in Leicester. The Victorian painting, by Hinckley artist William Bass, shows the moment King Richard loses his crown in the clash on 22 August 1485. In it, he is surrounded by armoured warriors with weapons drawn.

Advertisement

Was prehistoric Sussex home to hunter-gathers?

Archaeologists suspect they have found evidence that the Weald area of Sussex was cleared of woodland and used for agricultural purposes much earlier than was previously thought. In a year-long dig at Countryside Properties’ Wickhurst Green development near Horsham, archaeologists from Archaeology South-East found what they think could be a Neolithic structure upon which the dead were laid out before burial.