Christopher Columbus’s flagship the Santa Maria ‘has been found’

More than five centuries after Christopher Columbus’s flagship, the Santa Maria, was wrecked in the Caribbean, archaeological investigators think they may have discovered the vessel’s long-lost remains – lying at the bottom of the sea off the north coast of Haiti. According to the Independent, the leader of a recent expedition to the site said that all the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is the Santa Maria. So far, the team has carried out purely non-invasive survey work at the site – measuring and photographing it. The team hopes to carry out a detailed archaeological excavation of the wreck.
 

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More than five centuries after Christopher Columbus’s flagship, the Santa Maria, was wrecked in the Caribbean, archaeological investigators think they may have discovered the vessel’s long-lost remains – lying at the bottom of the sea off the north coast of Haiti. According to the Independent, the leader of a recent expedition to the site said that all the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is the Santa Maria. So far, the team has carried out purely non-invasive survey work at the site – measuring and photographing it. It hopes to carry out a detailed archaeological excavation of the wreck.

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To read the Independent article in full, click here.

Author of fake Holocaust memoir ordered to return $22.5m to publisher

The author of a bestselling Holocaust memoir has been ordered to pay back £13.3 million after she admitted much of her story was made up. In Misha: A Memoire of the Holocaust Years, published in 1997, Belgian writer Misha Defonseca claimed she was adopted by a pack of wolves and killed a Nazi soldier to survive after her Jewish parents were taken during the Second World War. But it emerged in 2008 that she was not Jewish, as claimed, and her tale of four years wandering through forests to escape the Holocaust was untrue.

To read the Guardian article in full, click here.

 

Digital memorial for First World War dead

The Imperial War Museum is to upload the records of all those who served with the British Army overseas between 1914 and 1918 to a digital memorial. The Lives of the First World War project will become the largest permanent collection of wartime biographies, remembering more than 4.5 million men and 40,000 women, the Telegraph reports. The first names to be put up are those who endured active Army service. Over the coming months, millions of new records will be added, including those who served with the Royal Navy and the Royal Flying Corps, the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and the Australian and New Zealand Imperial Forces.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

 

New film emerges of FDR walking

Never-before-seen footage of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt walking has been unveiled at the Pennsylvania State Archives. The film was shot in 1937 Major League Baseball pitcher James (Jimmie) DeShong on his 8mm home movie camera. Pennsylvania First Lady Susan Corbett, along with members of DeShong’s family, unveiled the rare film. President Roosevelt was paralysed from the waist down by polio in 1921. In the film, he is walking up a ramp in Washington, D.C.’s Griffith Stadium. He is wearing braces on his legs as he holds an assistant’s arm, and grasps a handrail to make it up the steps.

To read the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission press release in full, click here.

Petition for heroine war nurse to feature on £2 coin

The family of a British nurse sentenced to death for saving the lives of hundreds of soldiers during the First World War are calling for her to be commemorated on a £2 coin, the Telegraph reports. About 100,000 people have signed the petition demanding recognition for Edith Cavell, who helped more than 200 Allied troops escape from German-occupied Belgium, mainly funnelling them into the neutral Netherlands. She was known as the nurse who “saw no sides” because of the life-saving care she gave Allied troops and soldiers from the Axis powers alike.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

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