In pictures: objects of crime

Never-before-seen objects from the Metropolitan Police’s Crime Museum will go on show at the Museum of London in October

PincushionMuseumofLondon-403da74

Pin-cushion embroidered with human hair by repeat offender, Annie Parker, 1879. Annie was arrested more than 400 times for alcohol-related offences © Museum of London

Advertisement
JacktheRipperMuseumofLondon-c5c98f0

Poster appeal for information on Jack the Ripper, issued by Metropolitan Police, 1888 © Museum of London

Stratton20Brothers1905MuseumofLondon-d7abbb0

Masks used by the Stratton brothers – the first criminals to be convicted in Great Britain for murder based on fingerprint evidence, 1905 © Museum of London

violinandladder-0e3dcef

Fold-up ladder and violin belonging to cat-burglar Charles Peace, who was executed in 1878. Known as a musician, Peace would return to the houses at which he had performed to rob the inhabitants of their valuables © Museum of London

Acid20Bath20Murderer20194920Museum20of20London-192c1a6

Objects relating to the murder of Mrs Olive Durand-Deacon by John Haigh, 1949. Known as the Acid Bath Murderer, Haigh is known have killed six people, disposing of the bodies by placing them in concentrated sulphuric acid. Haigh was hanged in August 1949 © Museum of London

Spaghetti20House20Siege1975-148e250

Balaclava and hat worn by one of the gunman involved in the Spaghetti House Siege of 1975. The siege saw nine members of staff at a London restaurant taken hostage by armed gunmen © Museum of London

button20David20Greenwood-7a11af2

The button that was used to convict David Greenwood of the murder of 16-year-old Nellie Trew, 1918 © Museum of London

shrapnel-68c694d

Shrapnel from an unexploded Fenian bomb found at Paddington Station, 1884 © Museum of London

counterfeiting-0d432cd

Implements used for counterfeiting seized by Metropolitan Police © Museum of London

Ronnnie20Biggs-b8ceca0

Personal possessions of Ronnie Biggs and other members of the Great Train Robbery gang, recovered from their hideout at Leatherslade Farm, 1963 © Museum of London

Talcum20powder-a21c5e8

Talcum powder tin used to conceal microfilm by the Krogers, members of a Russian spy ring, 1961 © Museum of London

Briefcase with syringe and poison intended for use by Ronnie and Reggie Kray against a witness at the Old Bailey (never used), 1968 © Museum of London

Advertisement

The Crime Museum Uncovered is on show at the Museum of London between 9 October–10 April 2016. For more information, and to purchase tickets, visit the museum’s website