100 Women Who Changed the World: your reactions

After it was revealed that Marie Curie had topped our 2018 poll, 100 Women Who Changed the World, you took to social media to let us know your views and who you felt had missed out…

100 women who changed the world results. (Images by Getty Images)

BBC History Magazine’s 2018 poll listed 100 women who were voted to have had the biggest impact on world history, with scientist Marie Sklodowska Curie taking the top spot. Commenting on the result, president of the British Society for the History of Science Patricia Fara wrote: “Curie boasts an extraordinary array of achievements. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Price, first female professor at the University of Paris, and the first person – note the use of person there, not woman – to win a second Nobel Prize.”

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Marie Curie

African-American activist Rosa Parks, remembered for her role in sparking the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s, took second place, while social reformer Emmeline Pankhurst was voted third – her campaign for women’s suffrage being particularly topical in the centenary year of the 1918 Representation of the People Act. Historian Shrabani Basu wrote that, between them, “the top three women are the bedrock of our modern society”.

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But inevitably, with room for just 10 women from each of 10 categories nominated by experts including Jenni Murray, Suzannah Lipscomb and Tom Holland, there’s going to be plenty of debate about who missed out – and you’ve been in touch to let us know who you’d like to see included.

Who missed out?

Elizabeth I surely deserves to be in the top 20 at least, argues Tracy Borman. (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images)
Elizabeth I surely deserves to be in the top 20 at least, argues Tracy Borman. (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images)

One particularly notable omission, it seems, is Elizabeth I. Responding to the results, historian Tracy Borman wrote: “The Virgin Queen surely deserves to be in the top 20 at least. She ruled for longer and more successfully than any of her fellow Tudor monarchs.” Her call for the inclusion of ‘Gloriana’ was also echoed by historians Kate Williams and Peter Frankopan, as well as many other users on Twitter.

Others noted missing names. One was Austrian-born Hedy Lamarr (1913/14–2000), an actress and inventor whose work during the Second World War on communications technology led to the mobile phone. Also suggested was Rachel Carson (1907–64), an American biologist whose work on the natural world is widely credited with launching the environmental movement. Twitter user @deepgreenfire added: “Good to see environmental activist Wangari Maathai in at #30, though.”

Austrian-born actress and inventor Hedy Lamarr. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Austrian-born actress and inventor Hedy Lamarr. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

On Facebook, Yue Yun commented: “The list tries to include non-Western women, but I believe the representation is not enough. In my opinion, one non-Western woman who should be added is the Tang dynasty emperor Wu Zetian, whose rule caused lasting changes in China and the Korean Peninsula.”

Historian Anna Whitelock also noted a bias, writing that “the top 20 is dominated by white western women” and that while “the role of women in history is finally being acknowledged, there is some way to go before this is truly inclusive”.

Historian Greg Jenner agreed, writing on Twitter that polls such as this have “fascinating insights into cultural biases”.

Elsewhere, @camilleosborn82 questioned on Twitter why there was no place for Irish political activist Constance Markievicz (1868–1927), who in 1918 became the first woman elected to the British Parliament, though she refused to take her seat.

Irish politician and nationalist Countess Constance Markievicz, c1922. (Photo by Walshe/Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Irish politician and nationalist Countess Constance Markievicz, c1922. (Photo by Walshe/Topical Press Agency/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
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This year’s poll has highlighted the remarkable achievements of 100 women from history, and has also sparked debate about which women are celebrated and commemorated, and how. The Telegraph’s Claire Cohen has even speculated who we might celebrate in the future: “If you were to compile a list of women who changed the world in, say, 50 years’ time, what would it look like?”

Who else do you think should have been featured? Join the debate at facebook.com/historyextra or on Twitter @historyextra

To view the full results of the poll, click here. To view what the experts say, click here.