Schoolchildren to visit First World War battlefields under Government scheme

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Thousands of schoolchildren are to visit First World War battlefields to help ensure the “bravery and suffering” of the fallen is not forgotten. Under a government project all state secondary schools will get the chance to send pupils to sites such as the Somme and Passchendaele, to build a “lasting legacy” of the conflict among the current generation.

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How does 2,500-year-old music sound?

 

The music of ancient Greece played 2,500 years ago is to be reconstructed to enable modern-day audiences to hear how it sounded. Dr Armand D’Angour, a musician and tutor in classics at the University of Oxford, is using ancient documents inscribed with vocal notation to bring Greek music back to life.

Gaius Caesar ‘heading home’ to Italy

 

A Roman marble portrait bust of Gaius Caesar, the adopted son of Augustus Caesar, has sold at auction for £374,500. One of a small number that features Gaius with long sideburns and a short beard, the bust is to return to Italy following the auction at Bonhams Antiquities.

 

Sold: James Bond-style bomb manuals for Churchill’s ‘secret army’

Sabotage manuals issued to members of a secret unit formed during the Second World War have sold at auction for more than £2,000. The manuals, disguised as old calendars and fertiliser guides, detail how to make explosives and set booby traps.

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Revealed: the Houses of Parliament that never came to be

Abandoned 18th-century plans to redesign the Houses of Parliament may have led to the best ever parliament. That is according to Cambridge art historian Dr Frank Salmon. Speaking as plans get underway to restore parliament, Dr Salmon said designs drafted by architect William Kent in the 1730s in some respects represent the “mother of all parliaments”.