Buried WW2 bombing target examined

Archaeologists are exploring a buried World WarTwo target building in the New Forest where the biggest bomb ever dropped by British forces was tested.

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Archaeologists are exploring a buried World WarTwo target building in the New Forest where the biggest bomb ever dropped by British forces was tested. The Grand Slam, nicknamed Ten Ton Tess, penetrated the ground and sent shockwaves to damage enemy bunkers. It was tested on a concrete structure known as the Ministry of Home Security Target at Ashley Walk bombing range.

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Rare 16th century English shilling found buried in mud flats

A rare English shilling from 1551-53, issued during Edward VI’s brief reign, has been discovered in Vancouver. The coin was found by metal detectorist Bruce Campbell.

Revealed: how the Georgians taught us to diet 300 years ago

It’s that time of year again, when we vow to ditch the sugar, take out a gym membership, and follow religiously the latest weight loss guides. But while you might assume dieting to be a modern phenomenon, new research suggests it originates in an earlier century. As early as the 18th century, diet doctors began to recommend strict, low fat meals, and newspapers featured adverts for tonic and diet pills.
 

King Alfred excavation: pelvic bone discovered in museum storage

Part of a pelvic bone, most likely to be from King Alfred or his eldest son Edward, has been discovered in Winchester – not in the unmarked grave being examined by experts, but in a box in museum storage. In what researchers described as a “fluke”, a piece of an adult male pelvis was discovered in a box of bones at Winchester Museum. The bones had been recovered during a 1995–99 community excavation.
 

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Gareth Malone and Kate Adie voice BBC WW1 guides

Historian and presenter Dan Snow, The Choir’s Gareth Malone and broadcaster Kate Adie are among those voicing a new series of interactive guides on World War One. Using original material, they have been created by new BBC educational brand iWonder, to coincide with the launch of the BBC’s World War One season.