TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (23–28 January 2016)

Can't decide what programmes to watch or listen to? Here are 10 you won't want to miss...

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The Girl Who Forgave The Nazis
Channel 4
Saturday 23rd January, 8.00pm

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In 2015, Oskar Groening, who was a guard at Auschwitz, was found guilty of being an accessory to the murder of at least 300,000 Jews. During his trial, a Holocaust survivor, 81-year-old Eva Kor, publicly forgave and embraced the former SS man. This moving documentary explores the story of Kor’s gesture and the reaction to it.

Find out more here.

To read ‘Auschwitz: the men behind the mass murder’, click here.

 
Archive On 4: Utopias
Radio 4
Saturday 23rd January, 8.00pm

Michael Symmons Roberts marks 500 years since the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia with a documentary that traces how the idea of a perfect society has permeated our culture via figures as varied as Tony Benn, Aldous Huxley and Iain M Banks. Listen out too for Roberts’ dramatisation of Utopia (Radio 4, Sunday 24th January, 3.00pm).
 
Find out more here.

War And Peace
BBC One
Sunday 24th January, 9.00pm

Auntie’s epic Leo Tolstoy adaptation continues with Natasha agreeing to marry Andrei. However, his disapproving father insists upon a long engagement and Andrei has to head off abroad. Elsewhere, again thanks to family interference, Nikolai’s romance with impoverished Sonya isn’t going so well either.

Find out more here.

The Day Hitler Died
ITV
Sunday 24th January, 10.15pm

In 1948, an American lawyer filmed interviews with members of the Nazi inner circle who were trapped with Hitler in his bunker as the Red Army besieged Berlin. The recently rediscovered footage forms the basis of a documentary that, as the title suggests, charts the Führer’s last hours.

Find out more here.

© Finestripe Productions

From Savage To Self
Radio 4
Monday 25th January, 1.45pm

Over 10 weekday episodes, GP, musician and anthropologist Farrah Jarral explores the history of anthropology, the study of our own societies. She begins with the origins of the discipline, and subsequent shows look at such figures as James Frazer, one of the field’s founders.

Find out more here.

Immortal Egypt With Joann Fletcher
BBC Two
Monday 25th January, 9.00pm

The historian concludes her history of Ancient Egypt by looking at its downfall. It’s a story that encompasses the rule of Nubian kings, who governed from their southern homeland in Sudan, invasion by the Saites and, a man regarded as Egypt’s saviour, Alexander the Great.

Find out more here.

To read Joann Fletcher’s ‘The big questions of ancient Egypt’, click here.

© BBC/Lion TV/Amr Aboulfath

The Good Goering
Radio 4
Wednesday 27th January, 11.00am

Albert Goering was the younger brother of Luftwaffe chief Hermann and was questioned during the Nuremburg trials. Yet, when Albert claimed he had aided Jews and dissidents, and other witnesses supported his testimony, he was released. Gavin Esler travels to Germany to profile Albert – was he the ‘good Goering’ stories suggest?

Find out more here.

 

Pick of the Week…

Holocaust Memorial Day
BBC Two
Wednesday 27th January, 7.00pm

The theme of this year’s Holocaust Memorial Day is “Don’t stand by”. Expect this to be reflected in a ceremony at London’s Guildhall where more than 200 survivors will be in attendance. Later in the evening, Children Saved From The Nazis: The Story of Sir Nicholas Winton (BBC One, 10.45pm) profiles Nicholas Winton, who in 1939 rescued 669 children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia.

Find out more here.

Stonehenge: A Timewatch Guide
BBC Four
Wednesday 27th January, 9.00pm

Having a good rummage around in the BBC archives, Professor Alice Roberts considers how historians and archaeologists have chosen to interpret the ancient stone circle on Salisbury Plain. It’s a tale of new discoveries discrediting older ideas, of astronomers and geologists getting involved in research and, so often, of few definitive answers emerging.

Find out more here.

To read ’10 facts about Stonehenge’, click here.

© Brian Grant/Dreamstime.com

The Story Of China
BBC Two
Thursday 28th January, 9.00pm

Having last week established China’s ancient backstory, Michael Wood turns his attention to its first great international age, under the Tang dynasty. A surge in trade transformed the country and, a measure of the society’s sophistication, saw the construction of much of the Grand Canal. Plus, the historian looks at the dynasty’s fall from power.

Find out more here.

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To read Michael Wood’s ‘The Six Ages of China’, click here.