The public are ignorant about history, says Lucy Worsley

The average person knows little history beyond Henry VIII, Queen Victoria and the Nazis, television historian Lucy Worsley has claimed. In an interview with the Radio Times, the chief curator of the charity Historic Royal Palaces said the public are ignorant about history. Worsley, who will next month present a new series for BBC Four titled The First Georgians, said that such widespread ignorance posed a difficulty for academics seeking to heighten awareness of other historical figures.

To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

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The average person knows little history beyond Henry VIII, Queen Victoria and the Nazis, television historian Lucy Worsley has claimed. In an interview with the Radio Times, the chief curator of the charity Historic Royal Palaces said the public are ignorant about history. Worsley, who will next month present a new series for BBC Four titled The First Georgians, said that such widespread ignorance posed a difficulty for academics seeking to heighten awareness of other historical figures. 

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To read the Telegraph article in full, click here.

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British Pathé uploads newsreels to YouTube

Video film archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of moving images to YouTube. The archive of 3,500 hours of footage was digitised in 2002 thanks in part to a grant from the National Lottery, and is now freely accessible to anyone around the world for free, the Telegraph reports. The archive includes footage of Emily Davison throwing herself under the king’s horse, the Hindenburg disaster and the Hiroshima bombing. It also includes unusual footage of a baby gorilla taking a bath, and a 10 stone baby being teased with chocolate.

We’ve chosen our Top 10 videos here – from the D-Day landings to the original singing dog.
 

Shakespeare ‘a cultural icon’ abroad

An international survey released to mark the 450th anniversary of his birth reveals William Shakespeare to be the UK’s greatest cultural icon, BBC News reports. The survey asked 5,000 young adults in China, India, Brazil, Germany and the USA to name a person they associated with contemporary UK arts and culture. Shakespeare was the most popular response, with an overall score of 14 per cent. The Queen and David Beckham came second and third respectively.

To read the BBC News article in full, click here.

‘First World War trench flute’ to be played at concert

A flute thought to have been created in the trenches during the First World War is to be played in public for the first time in at least 50 years. The instrument, which is made from items including tobacco papers and bullet casings, was purchased by 74-year-old Andrew Fairley from a junk shop in 1963, BBC News reports. He contacted the Imperial War Museum about the instrument, and was told it was a one off. He is to play the flute as part of a concert in Woodbridge, Suffolk, on Sunday.

To read the BBC News article in full, click here.
 

Mussolini’s birthplace in Italy to get fascist museum

A museum dedicated to the history of fascism will be created in Predappio, Italy, the birthplace of dictator Benito Mussolini, it has been announced. The museum will be located in the now-abandoned Casa del Fascio, built in the 1930s as part of an urban renewal programme, UPI reports. Mussolini led Italy from 1922 until his death in 1943, and created the National Fascist Party.

To read the UPI article in full, click here.

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